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Murray Marks and His Friends Anonymous

Murray Marks and His Friends

Anonymous

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230318431
Paperback
48 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1919 edition. Excerpt: ... VII CHARLES AUGUSTUSMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1919 edition. Excerpt: ... VII CHARLES AUGUSTUS HOWELL MURRAY MARKS, on many occasions, came into contact with an extraordinary person whose name heads this chapter. It cannot be said that Howell was his friend, or, if the statement be made, it must be qualified by saying that Howell was his friend for a short time, and such may be said equally well about almost every person with whom Howell came into contact. Who exactly Howell was, or where he came from, it is difficult to say. It was reported that he was associated with high personages in Portugal. It was stated that he was involved in the Orsini conspiracy and had to fly to England. He always described himself as a man of high rank in Portugal,1 of the Da Costa or Posser family, and he certainly, on frequent occasions, when in evening dress, wore a broad red ribbon across his 1 Mr W. M. Rossetti says, Howell was born in Portugal, towards 1849, the son of an Englishman and a Portuguese mother. shirt front, with the Order of Christ,1 which he described as a Portuguese decoration hereditary in his family. He was at one time (circa 1865-1868) a private secretary to John Ruskin, becoming known to him in 1864 or 1865, and has been well described as the trusted friend and protege of that writer. He acted for some considerable time as Ruskins secretary and almoner, and the ever open-handed, generous, gentle donor allowed many of his contributions to those who were in poor circumstances, and who needed his assistance, to pass through the hands of Howell. That side of his history is a pleasing one, and Ruskins view of it is to be seen in the letters which he addressed to his secretary, and of which a selection appeared in the New Review for March 1892.2 These letters well set forth the private side of Ruskins...